HMS Woolston (1918)

HMS Woolston underway in April 1940 after her conversion to a long range convoy escort

History

United Kingdom

Class and type:
W Class

Name:
HMS Woolston

Builder:
John I. Thornycroft & Company

Laid down:
25 April 1917

Launched:
27 January 1918

Commissioned:
28 June 1918

Decommissioned:
August 1945

Motto:
Quo majores ducunt: ‘Where our forefathers lead we follow’

Honours and
awards:

ATLANTIC 1941
ARCTIC 1942
NORTH SEA 1941-43
SICILY 1943

Fate:
Sold for scrapping on 18 February 1947

Badge:
On a Field Black, a Roman galley, Silver.

General characteristics

Displacement:
1,120 tons standard

Length:
300 ft (91 m) o/a, 312 ft (95 m) p/p

Beam:
30 ft 6 in (9.30 m)

Draught:
10 ft 6 in (3.20 m)

Propulsion:
3 Yarrow type Water-tube boilers, Brown-Curtis steam turbines, 2 shafts, 30,000 shp

Speed:
36-knot (67 km/h)

Range:
320-370 tons oil, 3,500 nmi (6,500 km) at 15 knots (28 km/h), 900 nmi (1,700 km) at 32 knots (59 km/h)

Complement:
134

Armament:

4 × QF 4 in Mk.V (102mm L/45), mount P Mk.I
1 × QF 12 pdr 20 cwt Mk.I (76 mm), mount HA Mk.II
6 (3×2) tubes for 21 in torpedoes

HMS Woolston was a W Class destroyer of the Royal Navy.[1] She served through two World Wars, surviving both of them.

Contents

1 Construction, commissioning and early career
2 Wartime career
3 Postwar
4 Notes
5 Bibliography
6 External links

Construction, commissioning and early career[edit]
Woolston was ordered under the 10th Order of the 1916 – 17 Programme from the Woolston yards of John I. Thornycroft & Company. She was laid down on 25 April 1917, launched on 27 January 1918 and commissioned on 28 June 1918 under the command of Alexander Sholto Douglas.[2] She went on to serve briefly with the Atlantic Fleet during the First World War. She became part of the 4th Destroyer Flotilla in 1921 and transferred with the Flotilla to serve in the Mediterranean. She, along with a number of her sisters, were then reduced to the reserve. She was reactivated in 1938 having been selected for conversion into an anti-aircraft escort (or WAIR) at Chatham Dockyard.
Wartime career[edit]
Woolston was still under refit at Chatham on the outbreak of the Second World War. Around this time her pennant number was changed to L49, to match those used by escort destroyers. She spent October on post refit trials and then commissioned for service, join