Example of what happens to one’s brain inside their skull, when they are impacted by an outside force.

Concussions in England’s professional rugby union are the most common injury gained.[1] Concussion can occur where an individual experiences a minor injury to the head. Commonly occurring in high contact sporting activities; football, boxing, and rugby. It can also occur in recreational activities like horse riding, jumping, cycling, and skiing. The reason being that it doesn’t have to be something to strike you in the proximity of your brain, but can also be caused by rapid change of movement, giving the skull not enough time to move with your body, causing your brain to press against your skull.[2] With rugby being such a contact and fast moving sport, it is no wonder why there is concussion and other head injuries occurring. With the development of equipment and training methods, these will help benefit the players on the field know what could happen and how they can help with preventing it.

Contents

1 History of concussions
2 Connection with rugby union
3 Signs of Concussion
4 Treatment of the injury
5 Controlling concussions
6 See also
7 References

History of concussions[edit]
A concussion, which is known as a subset traumatic brain injury (TBI), is when a force comes in contact with the head, neck or face, or fast movement of the head, causing a functional injury to the brain.[3] Depending on where the location of impact, depends on the severity of the injury. It is short-lived impairment of neurological function, the brains ability to process information, which can be resolved in seven to ten days.[1] Not all concussion involves the loss of consciousness, with it occurring in less than 10% of concussions.[3] Second-impact syndrome is when a player has obtained a second concussion when you either return to field the same day, or return to play before a complete recovery from a previous concussion. This is a result from brain swelling, from vascular congestion and increased intracranial pressure, this can be fatal to a player as it is a very difficult medical injury to control.[4] The brain is surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid, which protects it from light trauma. More severe impacts, or the forces associated with rapid acceleration, may not be absorbed by this cushion. Concussion may be caused by impact forces, in which the head strikes or is struck by something, or impulsive forces, in which the head moves without itself being subject

Xiangmihu
香蜜湖

Location
Futian District, Shenzhen, Guangdong
China

Operated by
SZMC (Shenzhen Metro Group)

Line(s)
     Line 1

History

Opened
28 December 2004

Services

Preceding station
 
Shenzhen Metro
 
Following station

Chegongmiao
toward Airport East

Line 1

Shopping Park
toward Luohu

Xiangmihu Station (Chinese: 香蜜湖站; Jyutping: Hoeng1 Mat6 Wu4 Zaam6; literally: “Honey Lake Station”) is a station on Line 1 (Luobao) of the Shenzhen Metro. It opened on 28 December 2004. It is located underground at Shennan Dadao (Chinese: 深南大道), west of Xiangmei Lu (Chinese: 香梅路) near the entrance of Honey Lake Resort (Chinese: 香蜜湖渡假村), in Futian District, Shenzhen, China. It is near Shenzhen Golf Club (Chinese: 深圳市高爾夫球會)[1] and Shenzhen Special Zone Press Tower (simplified Chinese: 深圳特区报大厦; traditional Chinese: 深圳特區報大廈).[2][3]
Station layout[edit]

G

Exit

B2F
Concourse
Lobby
Customer Service, Shops, Vending machines, ATMs

B2F
Platforms
Platform 1
←      Line 1 towards Airport East (Chegongmiao)

Island platform, doors will open on the left

Platform 2
→      Line 1 towards Luohu (Shopping Park) →

Exits[edit]

Exit
Destination

Exit A
Shennan Boulevard North Side, Xiangmei Road, Municipal Administration Building, Urban Planning, Land & Resources Commission of Shenzhen Municipality

Exit B
Shennan Boulevard North Side, Shenzhen Honey Lake Country Club

Exit C
Shennan Boulevard North Side, Shennan Boulevard South Side, Xiangmei Road, Xinwen Road, Urban Planning, Land & Resources Commission of Shenzhen Municipality, Shenzhen Special Zone Press Tower, Renmin Building, Shenzhen Golf Club

References[edit]

^ Fraser Place Serviced Residences – Shenzhen[dead link]
^ Shenzhen Hotels Archived 12 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
^ Xiangmihu Station Archived 20 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine.

v
t
e

Shenzhen Metro lines and stations

 
Current stations

Line 1

Luohu
Guomao
Laojie  3 
Grand Theater  2 
Science Museum
Huaqiang Rd.
Gangxia
Convention & Exhibition Center  4 
Shopping Park  3 
Xiangmihu
Chegongmiao  7   9   11 
Zhuzilin
Qiaocheng East
OCT
Window of the World  2 
Baishizhou
Hi-Tech Park
Shenzhen University
Taoyuan
Daxin
Li

Katiola

Town, sub-prefecture, and commune

Katiola

Location in Ivory Coast

Coordinates: 8°8′N 5°6′W / 8.133°N 5.100°W / 8.133; -5.100Coordinates: 8°8′N 5°6′W / 8.133°N 5.100°W / 8.133; -5.100

Country
 Ivory Coast

District
Vallée du Bandama

Region
Hambol

Department
Katiola

Population (2014)[1]

 • Total
56,681

Time zone
GMT (UTC+0)

Katiola is a town in central Ivory Coast. It is a sub-prefecture of and the seat of Katiola Department. It is also a commune and the seat of Hambol Region in Vallée du Bandama District.
Transport[edit]
Katiola is served by a station on the national railway system and by Katiola Airport.
References[edit]

^ “Côte d’Ivoire”. geohive.com. Retrieved 7 December 2015. 

External links[edit]

MSN Map

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Departments and sub-prefectures of Hambol Region, Vallée du Bandama District

Regional seat: Katiola

Dabakala Department

Bassawa*
Boniérédougou*
Dabakala*
Foumbolo*
Niéméné
Satama-Sokoro*
Satama-Sokoura*
Sokala-Sobara
Tendéné-Bambarasso
Yaossédougou

Katiola Department

Fronan*
Katiola*
Timbé

Niakaramandougou Department

Arikokaha
Badikaha
Niakaramandougou*
Niédiékaha
Tafiré*
Tortiya*

* also a commune

This Vallée du Bandama District location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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t
e

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (February 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Relja Bašić

Born
(1930-02-14) February 14, 1930 (age 86)
Zagreb, Kingdom of Yugoslavia, (now Croatia)

Nationality
Croat

Occupation
Actor

Relatives
Elly (née Lerch) Bašić
(mother)
Mladen Bašić
(stepfather)

Relja Bašić (born 14 February 1930) is a Croatian actor, one of the most prolific and versatile Croatian actors with a career which lasts for more than half a century.
Bašić was born on 14 February 1930 in Zagreb, at the time of Kingdom of Yugoslavia. He was born to a Jewish mother Elly (née Lerch) Bašić.[1][2] Bašić was raised by his mother and stephfather Mladen Bašić. He first appeared on screen in 1954 classic film Koncert. Through the decades, he played many different roles in many different films, often in international co-productions. He never became a star, but remained one of the most recognisable and dependable character actors. His specialty were the roles of suave aristocratic villains, especially in historic films dealing with World War II, but his best remembered role is Mr. Fulir in 1970 cult musical comedy Tko pjeva zlo ne misli.
In the 1990s, Relja Bašić was an enthusiastic supporter of the Croatian Social Liberal Party. During 1992 parliamentary elections he appeared as that party’s candidate in one of Zagreb constituencies. He lost that race to Nedjeljko Mihanović of HDZ in controversial circumstances. A few months later, on elections for upper House of Croatian Parliament, he won the seat representing City of Zagreb.
In 1995, President Tuđman awarded him with the Order of Danica Hrvatska.[3]
Relja Bašić also acts as a UNESCO Artist for Peace.[4]

Contents

1 Selected filmography
2 Filmography
3 References
4 Bibliography
5 External links

Selected filmography[edit]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (February 2013)

Filmography[edit]

Film

Year
Title
Role
Notes

1954
Koncert
Bartol

1955
Millions on the Island
Žuti/Štakor

1956
The Siege
Adam

1956
Pulverschnee nach Übersee

1957
Sand, Love and Salt
Innkeeper

1960
The Battle of Austerlitz
Soldier
uncredited

1961
The Seven Revenges

1961
Le goût de la viol

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Promite /ˈproʊmaɪt/ is the registered brand name for a dark brown, salty food paste mainly used as a spread on sandwiches and toast similar to the better-known Vegemite and Marmite. Promite was invented in the 1950s by Henry Lewis & Company and marketed under the Masterfoods brand. Henry Lewis & Company later became MasterFoods Australia and New Zealand, before being bought out by the privately owned Mars family’s group of companies in 1967. As Mars, Incorporated is a privately owned U.S. company, Promite is no longer an Australian-owned food. However, Promite is still manufactured and sold in Australia.
Promite is made from vegetables and yeast extract, and is naturally high in various B vitamins. Promite has a sweeter taste, a darker colour and a softer, more spreadable texture than Vegemite.

Contents

1 Ingredients – Post 2013
2 Ingredients – Prior to 2013

2.1 Vitamins Removed

3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Ingredients – Post 2013[edit]
Promite contains: Vegetable Protein Extract, Sugar, Yeast Extract, Water, Colour (Caramel 150C), Salt, Cornflour, (from Wheat), Glucose Syrup (From Wheat), Onion, Emulsifier (Glycerol Monostearate), Thickener (Modified Cornstarch), Food Acid (Citric), Vegetable Gum (Carrageenan), Spice extract.[1]
Ingredients – Prior to 2013[edit]
Promite contained: vegetable protein extract, sugar, yeast extract, water, colour (caramel 150C), salt, cornflour (from wheat), glucose syrup (from wheat), onion, emulsifier (glycerol monostearate), thickener (modified cornstarch), food acid (citric), vitamins (niacin, thiamin, riboflavin), vegetable gum (carrageenan), flavour enhancers (627, 631), spice extract.[2]
Vitamins Removed[edit]
According to Mars Customer care:
“In 2013, we removed vitamins Thiamin (B1), Riboflavin (B2) and Niacin (B3), as well as two flavour enhancers, and found this to benefit some consumers sensitive to those vitamins, without impacting taste or texture”.
However, some natural vitamins remain from the raw ingredients, approximately:

Name
Vitamin
Abundance

Thiamin
B1
4mg / 100g

Riboflavin
B2
1mg / 100g

Niacin
B3
50mg / 100g

Pantothenic Acid
B5
12mg / 100g

Vitamin B6
B6
3mg / 100g

See also[edit]

Australia portal
Food port
분당오피